Six Great Spots For Vintage Tee Shopping on Melrose

Six Great Spots For Vintage Tee Shopping on Melrose

Melrose Avenue has always been a place to find both trendy styles as well as excellent vintage clothing. Vintage tees are a great way to express your personal style, whether kicking back with jeans and sneaks or dressing up with a skirt and jacket. Before you overpay on eBay, head over to Melrose and have fun poking around the racks of these shops that carry quality, variety and your next favorite t-shirt.

  1. WORLD OF VINTAGE

7701.world.of.vintage.tshirtsWorld of Vintage is all t-shirts, all the time. Whether you’re a collector looking for the official Guns N’ Roses 1992 tour jersey or a baseball fan hoping to find an old Cubs tank top, this is place to go. Really hard-to-find items are abundant. Some can be pricey, but competitive. The shirts are clean (not stinky or holey) with a decent size selection. This is not a five-minute stop so fuel up before diving in.

7701 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046
(323) 651-4058
Daily 11a – 7p

  1. CROSSROADS

7409.crossroads.trading.coCrossroads is essentially a chain recycled clothes store, which is pretty awesome. Each store reflects its neighborhood so you can discover cool items in any of them. On Melrose, Crossroads offers well-fitted, more fashionable t-shirts that work as statement pieces. All good quality and fairly-priced so you can grab a whole outfit while you’re there (pro tip: comfy worn jeans pair perfectly with a vintage tee.)

7409 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046
(323) 782-8100
Monday – Saturday 11a – 8p, Sunday 11a – 7p

  1. AMERICAN VINTAGE

7575.american.vintageAmerican Vintage has quintessential southern California tees; mostly lightweight, easy casual and sporty, and super inexpensive. Perfect for adding flavor to your day-at-the-beach outfit, or for some colorful errand-running wear. While the selection isn’t particularly large, it is all on point for hip comfort.

7575 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046
(323) 944-0640
Daily 11a – 8p

  1. REVOLUTION RECORDS

MelroseRevolutionRecords (1)There’s more to be said about what incredible gems can be found at Revolution Records, but let’s stick with the vintage music tees. There’s aren’t many, but there is high value in the small stock. In almost impeccable condition (as is everything in the store), you’ll most see pre-1995 tops that are unlikely to hit the market again any time soon. Perfect for collectors or the #1 music fan in your life.

7305 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046
(323) 424-7205
Daily 12p – 8p

  1. AMERICAN REBEL

01-american-rebelIf you like brand tees, sport tees, or random event tees, American Rebel has you covered. With both for-real vintage and neu-vintage offerings, the selection here is pretty consistent with hipster trends. The sizes run kind of large and boxy (read: men’s shirts) but ladies looking for comfy sleepers or workout wear will find top-of-line options here. The shirts are in impeccable shape: clean, not faded, no stains, rips or tears.

7474 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046 (located within SLOW)
(323) 944-0195
Monday – Saturday 12p – 8p, Sunday 12p – 7p

  1. YONADA26

MelroseYonada (2)Yonada26 has been meeting the needs of t-shirt lovers and collectors hitting Melrose Avenue for 25 years. Yonada is well-known for its band shirt selection, which is stunning in its variety and size options for both men and women. There are shirts for children as well. If music isn’t your thing, there are plenty of pop culture options as well. Big bonus: Yonada will custom cut your purchase so if you like the shredded, fringed, or sleeveless look, keep your scissors in the drawer and let a pro do it for you.

7653 Melrose Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90046
(323) 653-2561
Daily 11a – 7p

Deborah Brosseau

About Deborah Brosseau

Deborah Brosseau provides audience development services to arts & entertainment, lifestyle, and non-profit clients. She is a freelance writer, providing anything from local listicles to corporate profiles for various online publications. Having first experienced Melrose in the '80s, she enjoys writing about the old school creatives as well as the progressive new ones.